Phia Group Media

rss

Phia Group Media


The Silent Impact of COVID-19: The Rise in Mental Health & Substance Abuse Disorders

By: Philip Qualo, J.D.

Before COVID-19 became a common household name, the United States was already in the midst of a mental health crisis. Rates of suicides and drug overdoses have been climbing in recent years; for example, in 2017, 17.3 million adults in the U.S. had at least one major depressive episode. This staggering figure is likely not even a true reflection, as studies show many people don’t seek treatment at all finding that stigma and shame keep 80% of people out of treatment. As the COVID-19 pandemic has consumed the nation, and the world, many of us are learning the hard way that life during a pandemic has even the most resilient of us drowning in unprecedented levels of stress. School and work closures, as well as stay-at-home orders, feel like they might stretch on for months. The volatile economy and sudden job losses have added a layer of financial insecurity that wasn’t a factor in people’s lives just a few weeks ago. Meanwhile, the rates of COVID-19 infections are rising exponentially, creating intense anxiety about what day-to-day activities are even safe. For those at highest risk of developing complications or already ill, there’s the fear of getting sick, or sicker. In the worst cases, there’s the grief of losing loved ones. The combination of these stressors are common triggers for mental health disturbances and substance abuse disorders. 

 

COVID-19 hasn’t just disrupted our daily lives; it has also disrupted how our minds work. As stay-at-home orders remain in effect, people aren’t only isolated from care, but from each other. In the U.S., more than 25% of people live alone, and studies have linked loneliness to substance abuse and mood disorders. Others are stuck inside with abusive partners or are living in already strained relationships. Those managing addiction risk a potential relapse without access to in-person meetings or substance abuse rehabilitation services. Some will likely bounce back when life returns to normal, but for others, unmanaged stresses could lead to bigger problems down the line.

On the brighter side, the American Psychiatric Association finds video-based sessions “equivalent” to in-person care for diagnosis, treatment, quality, and patient satisfaction. Demand for telehealth mental services has already spiked. Talkspace, a text and video chat therapy service, has seen a 65% increase in customers since mid-February. Winsberg’s Brightside, an app that offers treatment and medication for anxiety and depression, has seen a 50% bump in new users since the start of the quarter. More than 50 companies have signed up or expanded their use of telehealth mental services, including big employers such as Nike and Target.

The federal government has also relaxed some of its previously restrictive privacy standards. In March, the Department of Health and Human Services issued guidance that it would not impose penalties for providers unable to comply with HIPAA privacy rules during the COVID-19 nationwide public-health emergency. That means, for the time being, therapists can conduct sessions using free and widely available services including FaceTime, Google Hangouts, or Skype, making those services much easier to access for those with the greatest need for it.

Much like we’ve seen elsewhere in the U.S. health-care system, the sudden and growing need for care has left mental health providers overwhelmed. The root of this problem is that there aren’t enough therapists to go around. Historically, practitioners could only serve patients in states where they were licensed, but states are rapidly working to relax those requirements to accommodate the influx of need. Each locality has its own licensing permissions, though, leaving telehealth mental service providers having to wade through a patchwork of regulations.

Even with the recent expansion of coverage for telehealth services, it is important to keep in mind that not all behavioral health issues can be addressed from afar, and people who need more hands-on treatment could fall through the cracks. Employers, however, can help to bridge this gap. One of the most important things employers can do is provide an employee assistance program (EAP) or ensure their employer-sponsored health plans offer mental health coverage. If an EAP is part of the benefits package, now is a good time to remind employees of the availability of such services. Companies should also consider compiling and distributing lists of available local mental health resources like therapists, psychiatrists, suicide hotlines, and even online meditation and yoga classes.

For businesses that are operating completely remote, regularly scheduled video meetings and virtual social events can also help to defray the mental challenges that accompany long periods of isolation.  Even simply allowing employees the opportunity to talk about their concerns and emotions can help. As the nation comes together to contain the spread of COVID-19 and protect our physical health, it is equally as important we be cognizant of our mental health as well as support our peers who may be experiencing emotional and challenges with substance abuse in these challenging times.

If you or someone you know is struggling, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800 273-8255.